Friday, July 29, 2011

Libya: The Peril Ahead of the Rebel Leaders

Friday, July 29, 2011
Even before they take the fight to Gaddafi in his stronghold, the rebel front is being threatened with what will definitely demoralize their leadership or destabilize their tenuous hold on the administration.
The first major blow has hit them. General Abdel Fattah Younes, their military commander, has been killed, the rebel National Transitional Council says (according to a BBC report of July 28, 2011).

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Diplomatic Recognition for the Rebels Only Confirms Split of Libya (Part II)

Thursday, July 28, 2011
The fundamental question concerning the status of the national capital city (Tripoli) is also worth examining within this context of diplomatic recognition for the rebels. Not until the rebels succeed in overrunning the pro-Gaddafi forces to add Tripoli to their prize in this fratricidal war, it will continue to be the hub of the pro-Gaddafi forces and as Libya’s national capital city under Gaddafi’s control. How to divest him of that control will be the next—and the most catastrophic—stage of the ongoing battle.
Tripoli is still the heart of Libya and will be the determining factor in this civil war. Whoever controls it will be the font of authority, which Gaddafi still is. Despite the destruction of over 710 of its strategic installations, it still commands respect as the country’s largest and most populous city.

Diplomatic Recognition for the Rebels Only Confirms Split of Libya (Part I)

Thursday, July 28, 2011
Britain has joined the queue of countries recognizing the Libyan rebel leadership (Transitional National Council) as the rulers of Libya. It has given full diplomatic recognition to the TNC and expelled the remaining eight diplomats appointed by Gaddafi to represent Libya’s interests in the United Kingdom. On the surface, this action by Britain may pass as unexpected. After all, 30 other countries (mostly those banded together in the NATO military campaign) have already done so.
But in reality, it underscores a dogged determination to help the International Coalition achieve its objective of regime change in Libya through the diplomatic means. In effect, the International Coalition’s military campaign alone isn’t enough and must be reinforced with the diplomatic coup d’état against Gaddafi.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

The West Has Begun Eating Its Own Vomit in Libya

Tuesday, July 26, 2011
After creating the impression that Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi has lost his legitimacy to continue ruling the country and must “go,” the West is now backtracking in desperation. It is changing the tune. Britain’s Foreign Secretary, William Hague, said yesterday that “Gaddafi must relinquish power but “may not have to leave Libya,” according to a BBC news report.
This statement, which reinforces a similar one made last week by France’s Defence Minister, Alain Juppe, conflicts sharply with what we have heard since the West inserted itself into the Libyan crisis on March 19. We wonder what other surprises there are yet to come.

Friday, July 22, 2011

Is Sunyani Nana Konadu’s Damascus?

Friday, July 22, 2011
Certainly, the Sunyani Verdict has shattered Nana Konadu Agyemang-Rawlings’ dreams of high-echelon politics and bruised her ego. So jolted, it must go without saying that she will find it difficult to outgrow that misfortune. On the flip side, however, the Sunyani Verdict has turned out to be the eye-opener, a defining moment, and a Damascus experience for her.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Acquiring Five Jets Now Won’t “Better Ghana”

Thursday, July 21, 2011
Parliament’s endorsement of two agreements to allow the government purchase five jets is not in the best interest of Ghanaians. We are told that four of the jets will go to the Ghana Armed Forces and one will be reserved for the Presidency.
I condemn both Parliament and the government for initiating this transaction, which reinforces concerns that our politicians lack the acumen to solve national problems. 
There is absolutely no need to waste money on such mechanical birds, especially at this time that living conditions are worsening astronomically and the people becoming despondent. Nation building cannot be done under such a condition.

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

REJOINDER: Will the NPP’s Akufo-Addo Ever Learn Any Lesson?

Tuesday, July 19, 2011
AN NPP DAMAGE CONTROLLER FALLS FLAT
I have read the rejoinder to my article (“Will the NPP’s Akufo-Addo Ever Learn Any Lesson?”) by a Sizwe Bansi and want to respond to his concerns with the view to either clarifying some knotty areas or to reinforce my stance. That rejoinder was published by MyJoyOnline on July 18, 2011.
The issues that I raised in my article have been in the public domain over the years and need no contextualizing. They are issues that can easily rattle Sizwe Bansi and others in the NPP who don’t want to be told anything negative about their darling politician, Akufo-Addo. 
Thus, by taking him to the proverbial slaughter house over his own flip-flopping, I have been deemed to have committed a cardinal sin against the NPP. Sizwe Bansi raised many issues; but I will respond to only those that piqued my interest. The rest have no substance, being a mere verbiage to waste my time.

REJOINDER: Will the NPP’s Akufo-Addo Ever Learn Any Lesson?

Tuesday, July 19, 2011
THE NPP'S HERBERT KRAPA DOESN'T PERSUADE ME

I have read the rejoinder to an article I wrote to criticize the NPP’s Akufo-Addo for failing to abide by his own prohibition against promise-making as the basis for wooing voters. In responding to my viewpoints, Herbert Krapa, Press Secretary to Akufo-Addo, went to a great length to suggest that I criticized Akufo-Addo out of mischief and ignorance. More intriguingly, he alleged that I was writing to please my paymasters.
I consider Krapa’s rejoinder as a good opportunity to sustain the discourse on our national leadership crisis and will gladly respond to his anxieties. I have serious concerns about his rush to judgement about the motive for which I write and the issues that feature in my writing and will be guided by them.  

Monday, July 18, 2011

The West’s Game of Deception in Libya Exposed

Monday, July 18, 2011
Several developments over the past few days have combined to further twist the Libyan conflict out of joint. Any hope that the conflict will be resolved soon through political and diplomatic means is fading fast.
Even before the proposal for a ceasefire agreed on by the Contact Group on Libya last Friday reaches Gaddafi for us to know how his reaction will determine the ebb and flow of events, enough is happening to heighten pessimism. Apprehensions are still on the rise, and it is clear that the Libyan conflict will drag on despite NATO’s continued airstrikes on anything perceived as pro-Gaddafi, be it human beings or military accoutrements.

Saturday, July 16, 2011

Are the People Really Listening to the NPP’s Akufo-Addo?

Saturday, July 16, 2011
I know that what I have set out to do in this opinion piece will definitely incur the displeasure of die-hard NPP followers who don’t want to hear anything contrary to what they have in mind about their party and its Presidential Candidate. To such fanatics, who regard Akufo-Addo as a sacred cow, any attempt by anybody to point out his dark spots is a sacrilege that must be met with an “all die-be-die” attitude (insults and vain threats of physical attacks).
They are quick to hurl insults at anyone who dares to see their sacred cow differently as if doing so will erase those dark spots. I have developed a tough skin for their insults and will go ahead to tell them what I have noticed as a problem for their Akufo-Addo as he goes round on this grassroots campaign tours.

Libya’s Gaddafi: Will He Go or Not?

Saturday, July 16, 2011
In a sudden twist of events, France has announced that Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi has given clear indications that he is ready to step down and leave Libya as demanded by his opponents. France’s claim came just before the Friday meeting of the Libya Contact Group (LCG) in Istanbul, Turkey, and formed the basis of deliberations and the outcome, which principally focused on a package of ceasefire proposals to be handed to Gaddafi for compliance.
According to France’s claim, contacts with Gaddafi’s regime indicated that he was ready to step down; thus, the Istanbul meeting focused on the prospect of Gaddafi’s peaceful departure.
Certainly, this claim has not been confirmed by evidence from Gaddafi himself, if his strident political rhetoric in the last few days is to be believed. There is no indication from Tripoli that Gaddafi will indeed step down as alleged by France. So, how else will the Libya Contact Group  tackle the conflict?

The U.S. Recognizes Its Future Stooges in a Divided Libya

Saturday, July 16, 2011

Despite a NATO bombing campaign of more than 6,000 sorties against his forces and military installations, Gaddafi still remains entrenched in the capital Tripoli. Reports from Libya over the past few days indicate the rising tide of massive support for him by his followers, who have attended rallies and demonstrated their preparedness to confront the rebels and their backers.
Even as the stalemate in the fighting in Libya continues to confound the anti-Gaddafi elements, a number of measures are being taken to concretize the partitioning of the country into two administrative areas—Western Libya under Gaddafi and Eastern Libya under the rebel Transitional National Council (TNC).

Friday, July 15, 2011

The West’s “Political Solution” is No Solution for Libya!!

Friday, July 15, 2011
Some 15 top diplomats of the Libya Contact group, including US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, met in Istanbul today (Friday, July 15) to discuss “a political solution” to the conflict in Libya while coordinating aid for the rebels.
The meeting—the fourth so far—came in the wake of the protracted stalemate in the fighting between forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi and his opponents. All those who mattered in the West’s political rhetoric about the NATO military campaign against Gaddafi attended the meeting.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Ghanaian Workers are Toiling for Nothing

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Once again, our politicians have found an easy way to have a big laugh because President J.E.A. Mills has made it possible for them to bite deep into the national cake at the expense of public-sector workers who have been denied End-of-Service Benefits (ESB).
Numerous factors have combined to confirm public fears that our politicians are self-centred. That is where the danger lies for our democracy.

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

The NPP Minority Makes Me…. Want to Piss!!

Wednesday, July 13, 2011
There is pissing everywhere. By whatever the NPP might mean or do to him, the former Minister of Local Government, Kwamena Ahwoi, may not be the only person to be prompted into pissing. Others are doing so for various reasons, mostly based on the political developments that have continued to create anxious moments for the people. It seems that many things are happening to make every one of us want to piss.

The uproar raised in Parliament for 45 minutes by the NPP Minority side is the latest development, which is not only appalling but which also provides moments for indiscriminate pissing. I am pissing myself off too… on them.

Sunday, July 10, 2011

The Sunyani Verdict: A Lesson for the Rawlingses

Sunday July 10, 2011
The outcome of the just-ended special delegates’ congress of the NDC at Sunyani sifted the political chaff from the grain. President Mills polled 2,771 votes (96.9%) and Nana Konadu Agyeman-Rawlings had 90 votes (3.1%) out of the total 2,861 valid votes cast. Five ballots were rejected. No negative incident happened to provide the party’s opponents with the ammunition to continue placarding it as “violent” or “undemocratic.” Congratulations to all who made the congress successful.
The thrashing of Nana Konadu by President Mills at speaks volumes. Plainly put, it indicates that President Mills enjoys overwhelming support from the party’s main pillars and should be supported and encouraged by all to rule the country in peace.

Why the UN’s Double Standards Hurt Humanity

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Once again, the United Nations has portrayed its double standards and given clear signals that it can’t be relied on to administer world affairs impartially. It is becoming increasingly clear that the UN has two different sets of standards for handling world affairs, depending on what best suits its manipulators’ interests. The UN has just interfered with an event that initially seemed to raise hopes that African leaders who misrule cannot escape justice.
By a stroke of its clout, the UN has stopped Senegal from extraditing the former Chadian President, Hissene Habre, to his country to face accusations that he committed atrocities during his eight-year rule between 1982 and 1990. His scheduled repatriation would have taken place on July 11; but the UN has intervened to prevent it.

Will the NPP’s Akufo-Addo Ever Learn Any Lesson?

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Promise-making in Ghanaian politics is a double-edged sword that cuts both ways. While it may help put in power whoever seems to be the glibbest, it also may turn out to be the cause of that victor’s undoing. We can tell from the scathing criticisms and tongue-lashing of President Mills and his government that electioneering campaign promises can be really scary. They threaten political fortunes.
It is within this context that I comment on a major problem that the NPP’s Nana Akufo-Addo has begun creating for himself as he sets out to attempt wooing the electorate in his second attempt at becoming Ghana’s President. I wonder why he can’t read deeper meanings into how he conducts himself to be able to win public goodwill toward the 2012 polls.

Friday, July 8, 2011

Senegal Teaches African Politicians a Bitter Lesson

Saturday, July 9, 2011

Chad's Hissene Habre will go into the record books as the first former African leader whose flight from justice for many years has been cut short by the very country that has harboured him for 21 years.

Senegal's octogenarian President, Abdoulaye Wade, has finally decided to hold the bull by its horns and no more by the tail. His government has decided to send back home the former Chadian President Hissene Habre to face accusations that he committed atrocities during his eight-year rule between 1982 and 1990. Senegal said Habre would be flown to Chad on 11 July, according to a BBC news report (July 8, 2011).

Thursday, July 7, 2011

The Libyan Crisis: Obama Spends Over One Billion Dollars?

Thursday, July 7, 2011

The Reuters News Agency reported today that a move to stop funding for President Barack Obama’s military intervention in Libya was narrowly defeated in the House of Representatives.
On a vote of 199-229, the House rejected the proposal to block defence funds in fiscal year 2012, which begins October 1, for US military participation in the NATO-led mission against Muammar Gaddafi’s forces in Libya. Sponsors of the failed measure were Democratic Representative Dennis Kucinich and Republican Representative Justin Amash.

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

The Libyan Crisis: An Anatomy of Conflict Resolution Lapses

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Now in its 15th week, the Libyan crisis seems to defy solution. To me, the conflicting rhetoric from all the parties involved in this crisis amounts to one thing: a failure to set a good example on effective conflict resolution.
In the latest political rhetoric, Russia criticized the bombing of Libya, saying the mission has lost its original focus on protecting civilians, and is now about removing the Libyan government. In a statement, Russia called for an “immediate ceasefire” and talks “with support, but not interference, from outside the country,” according to a BBC report.

Saturday, July 2, 2011

Libya: At long last, Commonsense Is Creeping In

Saturday, July 2, 2011

News reports that the Libyan rebels have welcomed an African Union offer to open talks without the direct involvement of Muammar Gaddafi are heart-warming. 

This is the first time that some commonsense approach is emerging for us to see how the Libyan crisis will be resolved through a peaceful, negotiated settlement, not through the fire-power of NATO’s military campaign. Shame unto the war-mongers and their tunnel-vision!

Is President Kufuor also one of the Prophets?

July 2, 2011
The day of “political prophecy” seems to have dawned all too soon. Former President John Agyekum Kufuor is reported to have predicted that the NPP will win the 2012 elections. He made the prediction on Hot FM in Accra yesterday (Ghanaweb.com, July 2, 2011).
After reading the news report, I asked myself: What has Mr. Kufuor seen to make such a bold prediction? 

Friday, July 1, 2011

For Once, the African Union Stands Tall…

Friday, July 1, 2011

After many years of uncertainty on how to carve a niche for itself and be respected in the international community, the African Union (AU) seems to be discovering itself. 
Even if it hasn’t yet completely persuaded us that it is taking concrete steps to solve our problems, the decision it made at the just-ended conference in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, paints a different and positive picture of a continental union that doesn’t any more want to remain an underdog in international politics. 
This news from Malabo is not only refreshing but it also worth celebrating as a mark of "political maturity" on the part of the AU.